Social-justice agency commends president for ‘critical first step’

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The United Methodist General Board of Church & Society (GBCS) has sent a letter to President Obama commending him on his Nov. 20 executive order that extends deferred status to as many as 5 million undocumented immigrants. The letter also emphasizes that this executive order is a “critical first step” toward recognizing the dignity and worth of more than 11 million undocumented persons in the United States.

The Rev. Dr. Susan Henry-Crowe, GBCS chief executive, signed the letter that was also copied to Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson and Cecilia Muñoz, assistant to the President and director of the Domestic Policy Council at the White House.

The letter thanks the president for shutting down the Secure Communities program that has “increased racial profiling” and further increased an atmosphere of fear among immigrant communities.

The letter acknowledges that this executive order is but a first step toward fixing the U.S.’s broken immigration system. The letter calls on the White House and Congress to pass bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform that is just.

United Methodists “have been standing up to offer hospitality and refuge for immigrants and their families, and speaking out on their behalf,” the letter points out. It adds, “We also, however, stand with those who continue to be in the shadows because their situation does not qualify for the reprieve your executive order provides.” For example, the letter states that the executive order does not relieve all persons searching for a way to reunite with family, seeking asylum, or trying to make a better life for themselves.

The General Board of Church & Society is one of four international general program boards of The United Methodist Church. Prime responsibility of the board is to seek implementation of the Social Principles and other policy statements on Christian social concerns of the General Conference, the denomination’s highest policy-making body. The board’s primary areas of ministry are Advocacy, Education & Leadership Formation, United Nations & International Affairs, and resourcing these areas for the denomination. It has offices on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., and at the Church Center for the United Nations in New York City.

The letter to President Obama follows:

Letter to President Obama
on immigration executive order

The General Board of Church and Society of The United Methodist Church commends your order to grant deferred status for as many as five million undocumented immigrants through Immigration Accountability Executive Actions. Such an order is a critical first step toward recognizing the dignity and worth of more than 11 million undocumented persons in our communities.

Many United Methodists have been standing up to offer hospitality and refuge for immigrants and their families, and speaking out on their behalf. Therefore, we rejoice with the many families who now may remain together. We give heartfelt thanks for ending the “Secure Communities” program that increased racial profiling and made persons fearful to come forward to report a crime. Such fear does not live up to our nation’s tradition of human rights, respect, and decency for all persons.

We also, however, stand with those who continue to be in the shadows because their situation does not qualify for the reprieve your executive order provides. The order does not relieve all persons searching for a way to reunite with family, seeking asylum, or trying to make a better life for themselves.

The United Methodist Church’s Social Principles “recognize, embrace, and affirm all persons, regardless of origin, as members of the family of God.” That family does not include only mothers, fathers and their progeny, but also the widow, the orphan, and, as you, Mr. President, so pointedly noted, the foreigner (Exodus 23:9). We must continue to work together so that all of our brothers and sisters are able to stand in the light of freedom, justice, and opportunity.

We know that this executive action only provides temporary relief from deportation. We realize it is not the ultimate goal of comprehensive, just immigration reform. Thus, we call on the White House and Congress to pass bipartisan legislation that reforms our broken immigration system.

We urge you, Mr. President, to continue to courageously promote peaceful order in our communities, freeing us from the fear of discrimination and the sin of over-incarceration that plagues our nation. Be assured, The United Methodist Church will continue to stand for justice and peace for all those who suffer violence and oppression in our world.

—Susan T. Henry-Crowe
General Secretary
General Board of Church & Society
The United Methodist Church
November 21, 2014

Contact Info

Wayne Rhodes
Director of Communications
General Board of Church & Society
The United Methodist Church
(202) 488-5630 / wrhodes@umc-gbcs.org